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HIGHLIGHT

UC San Diego CSE professor and alumni co-founded Tortuga Logic in 2014.

December 15, 2017
Company Based on UC San Diego Technology Gets Infusion of Capital

The company Tortuga Logic -- cofounded by a UC San Diego computer science professor and two CSE alumni -- has received $2 million in seed funding from Eclipse Ventures to expand engineering, sales and marketing.[more]

 

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2.21.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Bioterror experts propose early-warning technologies

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports on an AAAS briefing about efforts to develop bioterrorism technologies to detect and then respond to possible attacks. He notes that UCSD and SDSU are working on such technologies, including "smart dust" (partially funded by Calit2) and command centers to "to test technologies emergency workers will undoubtedly need as they respond to a terror attack. Equipped with computer banks, wall-size video screens and video Internet connections, these 'visualization centers' are designed to provide real-time information on numerous aspects of a disaster," a reference to vizcenters in both the Jacobs School and Calit2's facility at Scripps.
[more]

2.20.2005
"Los Angeles Times"
Art, Science Mix at UCI

At the Beall Center for Art and Technology at UC Irvine, engineers, computer scientists and digital artists create art that is ultramodern, innovative — and sometimes noisy. With its array of interactive, performance- and installation-based exhibits, the Beall Center is well on its way to accomplishing its mission of redefining the gallery experience.
[more]

2.19.2005
"Innovations Report"
Map of human genetic variation across populations may promise improved disease treatments

The German technology news service reports on the "mapping of key genetic signposts across three human populations [that] could help speed efforts to pinpoint disease-related DNA variations, and ultimately may promise more effective, individualized treatments." It notes that UCSD computer scientist Eleazar Eskin -- a Calit2 researcher -- co-authored the report published in Science magazine.
[more]

2.18.2005
"Science Magazine"
Whole-Genome Patterns of Common DNA Variation in Three Human Populations

Calit2 researcher Eleazar Eskin co-authored a new study mapping genetic variation in three human populations. The UCSD computer scientist cooperated on the study with scientists from Perlegen Sciences, Inc., and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute.
[more]

2.18.2005
"Reuters/Los Angeles Times"
Genome map offers first look at human differences

Writer Maggie Fox reports that the first published map of human genetic differences offers a major step toward truly personalized medicine. She notes that to make the map, scientists at the company Perlegen Sciences "worked with researchers at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California San Diego, and the University of California at Berkeley's International Computer Science Institute." They scanned 71 Americans of African, European and Asian descent, picking out 1.58 million of the most common single-letter variations in the genetic code. This article also appeared in the Los Angeles Times and other publications.
[more]

2.18.2005
"New Scientist"
Genetic variation map may promise tailored drugs

Writer Will Knight reports that "a new map of genetic 'signposts' that reveal general variations in the human genome could lead to more effective, genetically-tailored drugs. A study of 1.58 million genetic markers across 71 individuals of different genetic heritage showed that the markers correspond to general genetic variation... But the researchers - from Perlegen Sciences, the Computer Science Institute in California and the University of California, San Diego, all in the US - stress that this does not mean people with different ancestral history can be divided into discrete groups on a genetic basis." Jacobs School computer scientist and Calit2 researcher Eleazar Eskin co-authored the study that appeared in the Feb. 18 issue of Science magazine.
[more]

2.17.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
Wireless technology to the rescue

In an Op-Ed article, Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao argues that wireless technology could have saved thousands of lives in the wake of the Indian Ocean tsunami, and explains how the institute's RESCUE is developing technologies that could improve communications in future disasters.
[more]

1.31.2005
"GRIDtoday"
UCSD Expands Cyberinfrastructure Program to China, Thailand

In its special-features section, the online news service highlights the expansion of the Pacific Rim Undergraduate Research Experiences (PRIME) program, which will double the number of UCSD students working on research projects related to cyberinfrastructure, with students deployed to Japan, Taiwan, China, Thailand and Australia. The principal investigator on the NSF-funded project is Gabriele Wienhausen, Provost of Sixth College and leader of Calit2's Education activities at UCSD, with support from Peter Arzberger, director of UCSD's Life Sciences Initiative and deputy leader of Calit2's Digitally Enabled Genomic Medicine layer on the campus.

[more]

1.27.2005
"Irvine World News"
Technology Transfers Debated

The approach a university takes in licensing transactions, also called "technology transfers," and the approach a corporation takes were compared and contrasted during "The Art of Research and Technology Transfer," a multi-lecture/panel-discussion conference held at the University Club on the UC Irvine campus. The event was sponsored by OCTANe @ UCI, the Orange County Technology Action Network, a Calit2 partner.
[more]

1.24.2005
"Chicago Sun-Times"
Major players put Chicago on map for grid computing

In a sidebar titled "Central location makes city right site for grid work," business reporter Howard Wolinsky reports on the emergence of Chicago as a center of grid computing research and rollouts. He quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr in his capacity as founding director of the National Center of Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois, as writing that "Chicago is an artifact of the emergence of infrastructure." The quote is from the new book Grid 2 -- edited by Argonne's Ian Foster, a grid computing pioneer.
[more]

1.24.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Broadcom: Hope for Unrealized Ambitions

UC Irvine hopes chipmaker Broadcom Corp.'s move to the University Research Park adjacent to UCI will facilitate interaction and spur cooperation between the high-tech company and the research element of the university.
[more]

1.23.2005
"Daily Pilot"
Technology Plays Tunes

LEMUR exhibit (League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots) is open at UC Irvine's Beall Center for Art & Technology Jan.14-March 19. The exhibit showcases robotic instruments that can play themselves.
[more]

1.21.2005
"OC Weekly"
Over the Cliffs; LEMUR Follows the Crowd

LEMUR sounded like it would be AWESOME: the League of Electronic Musical Robots would be performing at UC Irvine’s Beall Center for Art and Technology, which almost always has rocking robotics; even when installations are Pong-era blips, they’re ironically and nostalgically so. And robots make everybody happy, especially if they’re robot butlers or talking cars. But mostly robot butlers.
[more]

1.19.2005
"TelecomFlash"
Honolulu: Broadband's Playground

In a report from Honolulu, Steve McClelland reports on efforts to develop "the Pacific’s very first 'Broadband Playground.'" He quotes Calit2 director Larry Smarr as calling optical networks "change agents" for science. Writes McClelland: "Smarr says scientists in Tokyo will be able to routinely swap their 300 Terabytes of climatological data with the counterparts at the Max Planck Institute in Germany... Smarr sees HDTV sea bed sensors remotely monitored by optical cable but warns scientists will need to be flexibly minded to take full advantage of the new systems. [He] compares the situation with that of 1985 when only 100 people in the U.S. were able to capitalize on the power of newly-developed supercomputers. Flexibility of mind to capitalize on global-scale networking is what Smarr seems to be saying is needed."
[more]

1.14.2005
"San Diego Metropolitan"
Daily Business Report

"And you thought your cable at home was fast," is the kicker on a story about UCSD announcing that it is now connected via a production 10 gigabit connection to CENIC's CalREN backbone network. The daily columnsquotes Chancellor Marye Anne Fox as saying, "While we have other, faster connections for specialized research projects on campus, the new 10 gigabit Ethernet connection enables every campus member to access the full power of broadband and access the global Internet and Internet2 community at large." The article goes on to note that "other institutions at UCSD that are participating in the high-performance campus network include the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology."
[more]

1.13.2005
"FreshNews.com"
Production 10 Gigabit Ethernet Campus Link to CalREN

The San Diego technology e-newsletter and website report that UCSD upgraded from a one gigabit connections to the CalREN high-performance backbone network for California universities, to "the first production 10 gigabit Ethernet campus connection in the United States...  This new link provides unprecedented wide area network capacity to UCSD's students, faculty and staff." Calit2 participated in the deployment of the new Internet bandwidth, which will also support several networking projects such as the Calit2-led OptIPuter.
[more]

1.13.2005
"SoCalTech.com"
UCSD, CENIC Wire 10G Network

The online news service reports that UCSD and CENIC "have connected the first 10 Gigabit Ethernet broadband network into CENIC's high performance backbone network, CalREN. The connection gives UCSD students and staff the highest performance, production 10G campus connection in the U.S."  
[more]

1.12.2005
"RedNova"
Phoning Home From the Ocean Floor Via Computer

The online science news service reports on the LOOKING ocean observatory project led by UCSD and the University of Washington. Calit2 director Larry Smarr is co-PI on the project. [This article first appeared in Sea Technology Magazine , a subscription-only publication.]
[more]

1.11.2005
"San Diego Union-Tribune"
SDSU center will help guide tsunami relief workers

Science reporter Bruce Lieberman reports on efforts at SDSU's visualization center to provide detailed satellite maps and imaging to help relief agencies in the tsunami-struck Indian Ocean region. He quotes the center's co-director, professor Eric Frost, who has led the collaboration between UCSD and SDSU researchers within Calit2.
[more]

1.10.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Executive Summary: Top Stories

Irvine-based Broadcom Corp. signed a blockbuster $183 million lease with The Irvine Company for 685,000 square feet of space in eight buildings at University Research Park near the University of California, Irvine.
[more]

1.6.2005
"IGN Insider"
Robots Like Music Too

LEMUR (The League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots) is bringing their unique, mechanically inclined brand of sound to UC Irvine's Beall Center for Art and Technology.
[more]

1.5.2005
"Orange County Register"
Broadcom move a boon to UCI

Chip maker Broadcom Corp.'s move to the University Research Park, adjacent to UC Irvine, will lead to more collaboration with the university, including the schools of engineering and computer science, and Calit².
[more]

1.4.2005
"Technology Review"
What Lies Beneath

The crustal plates that lie beneath miles of ocean are in constant movement, shifting imperceptibly every second. But the seismologists who track them have had to rely on an investigative schedule dictated by the calendar, rather than the clock. John Orcutt, deputy director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Calit2 participant, is quoted as saying "now we can create a data grid of sensors that all forward their data to the system... The tricky part is to interact intelligently with the sensors. That’s something that hasn't been done much. We're using it for seismology, but it's applicable to meteorology, oceanography -- all sorts of fields in which you're using instruments remotely." 

[more]

1.4.2005
"Orange County Business Journal"
Broadcom Moving to Research Park

Irvine chipmaker Broadcom has struck a deal to move its headquarters to the city's University Research Park, taking 700,000 square feet in eight buildings. Broadcom plans to move from its current Irvine Spectrum base in two years. The Irvine Company, which owns University Research Park, plans to put up buildings for the chipmaker.
[more]

1.1.2005
"Cabling Business Magazine"
The Ultimate Playground for IT Imagineers

Extensive cabling technology was needed to supply the flexible communications infrastructure required in the Calit2 Irvine building. This article details the design and technology used in the new 120,000-square-foot building. 
[more]

1.1.2005
"OC Weekly"
Basic Programming: OP_ERA Beginning to See the Light

A review of the OP_ERA exhibit currently on display at UCI's Beall Center.
[more]

1.1.2005
"MSNBC"
Robo Roach: Bionic Bug Takes Control of the Driver's Seat

Calit2 and ACE graduate student Garnet Hertz uses hissing cockroaches to navigate robotic vehicles.
[more]

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